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McLaren 570S Spider 2018

First Drive: 2018 McLaren 570S Spider

Another (almost) unforgettable experience in McLaren’s new Sport Series drop top

BARCELONA, SPAIN — Sometimes you find that sweet spot when a car and the road or track you’re experiencing it on are a perfect match. Everything flows and you seem smoother, cleaner, and more precise as a driver than ever before, the car dancing to your tune without a heartbeat’s delay. Back in October of 2015, I was in that sweet spot with the McLaren 570S on the Portimao race circuit in Portugal and the roads nearby. Something clicked that day and it was unforgettable.

So surely, then, the new McLaren 570S Spider on sun-baked roads that sweep and roll over Montserrat near Barcelona is pretty much a foregone conclusion? It’s going to be epic, right? Nevertheless, I felt it was my duty as a journalist to be absolutely sure, and duly accepted the editor’s invitation to see if a 570S with its roof removed could possibly be as good in practice as it sounds in theory. There would be no track element this time and the local Policia were, by all accounts, a little trigger happy with their radar equipment, but the 250-mile route over some incredible and varied roads should still reveal all there is to know about this enticing, almost mouth-watering proposition.

First, a bit of context. The Spider is set to become McLaren’s biggest volume seller. It joins the brand’s Sports Series range alongside the aforementioned 570S and the slightly softer and more capacious 570GT. It’s also, like all McLarens, naturally predisposed to make for a hell of a convertible simply because of its carbon fiber chassis, dubbed MonoCell II. So stiff is this central structure that the Spider has zero additional chassis bracing and the steering, suspension, and electronics tune is almost exactly the same as the coupe’s. Changes are limited to «a couple of tweaks to the damper programming» according to Ben Gulliver, McLaren’s head of vehicle development.

So the bald numbers go like this: $208,800 (a premium of $20,200 over the coupe), 3,302 lbs (up just 101 lbs) with fluids and 90-percent fuel load, 562 hp at 7,500 rpm and 443 lb-ft at 5,000-6,500 rpm, 0 to 60 mph in 3.1-seconds, and a top speed of 204 mph with the roof up or 196 mph with the retractable hard-top stowed away. In case you’re wondering, that 60 mph time is identical to the coupe and the Spider is only one-tenth slower over the 0-124 mph (200 kph) European yardstick at 9.6 seconds.

In performance terms then, it gives away almost nothing to the coupe and dynamically it should be virtually identical, too. Perhaps the bigger question is whether the 3.8-liter twin-turbocharged V-8 will feel more characterful without a carbon-fiber barrier between driver and induction and exhaust.

For the slow crawl through Barcelona, the two-piece roof remains in place and I remind myself what I like about the 570S already: The simple, elegant cabin architecture is as appealing now as it was back in late 2015, but the quality has taken a huge leap forward. The ride, despite the «cheaper» solution of conventional springs, dampers, and anti-roll bars for the Sport Series cars as opposed to the hydraulically-linked ProActive chassis control of the 720S, is also beautifully resolved. It will patter over really broken surfaces but it rarely jars and has a lovely polish to the way it rounds off the worst bumps and lumps. The suspension settings between Normal and Sport modes are pretty close and on the smoother roads we’ll find later, even Track mode is perfectly usable. Whichever setting you choose though, you feel connected to the surface but it’s not dictating the car’s behavior.

Another highlight felt even at little more than walking pace is the steering. McLaren continues to resist electronic power assist steering systems and its faith in hydraulically assisted racks is absolutely justified in the Spider. It positively sings with feedback and the weighting and response feel so natural. It also helps this car to connect with the driver immediately, which in itself marks the Spider out as something special. A sports or supercar should engage you from the moment the wheels roll, and McLaren seems to really understand that now.

With the city slowly receding in the rear view mirror it’s time to lose the roof and get closer to that 3.8-liter V-8. The two composite panels stow away in 15 seconds at speeds of up to 25 mph and the glass wind deflector drops to 75 percent of its full height. With the windows up the wind swirls a little but it’s perfectly pleasant even at Policia-worrying speeds. And the noise? There’s plenty of it with our Sports exhaust-equipped car (a $4,090 option). The deep, frenzied blast of hot gases mirrors the simply phenomenal intensity of the acceleration. It’s not a beautiful sound. Even so, as the V-8’s angry voice reflects and bounces it ways up rock faces as the twin-clutch 7-speed gearbox punches in shifts with a wicked ignition crack, you know the 570S Spider is a pretty serious supercar.

Yes, I said supercar. McLaren likes to assert that the Sports Series cars are mere sports cars, but the speed, agility, and focus of the Spider feels pretty damn super. You really do feel the benefits of its lean carbon fiber physique compared to rivals like the R8 because it changes direction so cleanly, rides with such poise and fires along the straights with a real ferocity if you wring the engine right out. But what’s especially impressive is that there’s a delicacy to everything it does. Something like a 911 Turbo S batters a road into submission and makes progress in a series of frantic lunges. By comparison, the 570S Spider glides.

That almost balletic approach makes you want to be smoother, neater, and better, too. The pedals are perfectly placed to practice left-foot braking. When you try you find that what felt like slightly too long of a pedal travel with your right foot suddenly feels perfect. I love that you can unpeel layers of the 570S Spider’s character and abilities over time like this. It’s one of those cars you know you’d be learning new things about for months, maybe years to come.

My only problem with the 570S Spider is that there’s a slight mismatch between the magic of the chassis and the response of the twin-turbocharged V-8. You want to pour the car down a road, using its agility, mid-corner stability, and carrying speed. So your instinct is to stay in a higher gear and let the car take the strain, but when you do the Spider’s balance disappears on corner exit. You expect instant throttle response — every other control is almost telepathic — but don’t get it as the power comes in relatively slowly. The rear can’t help but steer the car and instead the nose pushes wide.

Try a gear lower and the problem remains: You’ve nailed the corner entry thanks to those lovely carbon-ceramics, turned the car in, and felt the grip levels intimately thanks to that feelsome steering. At this point the Spider is balanced, right up on its toes. You spot the road straightening and want to pop out onto it like a champagne cork, but you pin the throttle and not much happens… then, maybe a half-second after you’d wanted it, the power comes in hard but the corner is over and you feel like you only got to enjoy half of it.

Okay, maybe an even lower gear? Yep, that works. There’s still some waiting for the turbos to really start working hard, but now you can use the chassis balance and feel how well calibrated the Dynamic mode for the ESC systems is. It lets you push right to the edge but subtly manipulates the rear back into line should you over commit. Even so, there’s something slightly out of kilter here. The handling allows you to be smooth, measured, and accurate, but the engine demands you absolutely beast it to really maximise the car’s inherent poise.

I keep daydreaming about how special a 570S Spider fitted with an Audi R8 Plus engine might be. Of course, that’s never going to happen. So back in the real world (well, for some people), should you take a 911 Turbo S Cabriolet, R8 V10 Spyder or McLaren 570S Spider? I think the McLaren wins. And by a pretty decent margin.

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First Drive: 2018 McLaren 570S Spider

McLaren’s al-fresco 570S Spider pins the gawk-o-meter wherever it goes

BARCELONA – As sure as the day is long, a junior supercar will eventually lose its lid. Exhibits A through C include the Ferrari 488, Audi R8 and Lamborghini Huracan. Might as well add the somewhat less exotic (but equally devastating) Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet into the mix.

Now an edgy, carbon-fibre Brit throws its hat into the ring. Or should I say to the wind? Say hello to the 2018 McLaren 570S Spider. It’s coming to Canada this September with starting price of $247,500; that’s $30,000 more than the 570S Coupe.

Funny how we’ve come to refer to these sub-650 horsepower land-based missiles as junior supercars, now that the ridiculous escalation of power (and pricing) in this rarefied segment necessitates further classification: supercars, hypercars, holy-sweet-mother of-God cars … and the Bugatti Chiron.

This, by no means, suggests the 2018 McLaren 570S Spider – with its “mere” 562 horsepower – is wanting in the go department. Is it fast? Uh, does Canadian Tire sell ladders? McLaren has picked an ideal spot for the Spider’s drive and the weather is cooperating in Spain. It’s warm, dry and sunny, and the sinuous blacktop that works its way into Barcelona’s surrounding mountains like so many black tentacles provides the perfect playground.

The 2018 570S Spider surely checks all the exotic boxes. With its carbon-fibre tub and aluminum composite skin, it weights in at a rather svelte 1,483 kilograms – that’s 228 kilograms less than the Audi R8 Spyder, we’re told. The rear mid-mounted, twin-turbo 3.8-litre V8 sends its 562 horsepower and 443 lb.-ft. of torque to the rear wheels at 5,000 rpm, and through a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission.

It’s the visuals, however, that slap you upside the head. Here in optional Curacao Blue and sporting a true exotic affectation – dihedral doors – our wicked wedge pins the gawk-o-meter wherever we go. It really is a gorgeous little thing, and watching the fifteen-second mechanical ballet that has the composite roof panel tucking itself away under the rear tonneau only adds to the allure. It will operate at speeds up to 40 km/h.

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

The wheels on this tester are optional forged lightweight units – 19-inch up front and 20-inch out back. You’ll see that word “optional” a lot here, as the Spiders on this drive are part of the initial run of 400 Launch Edition models that are generously equipped to a level that McLaren expects most customers to covet.

However, there’s no graceful way to get in thanks to the wide carbon fibre sill and steeply raked windshield. Once ensconced, the optional two-tone Carbon Black and Almond White Sport Design seat fits me perfectly. My hands land on a trim Alcantara-rimmed wheel with optional carbon fibre spokes and the coolest carbon fibre shift paddles imaginable – all part of an optional interior trim package that could be reasonably categorized as bloody essential.

The centre stack has a vertical touchscreen interface with GPS navigation that would get a “meh” in any other car. Here? Who cares. Gotta love the HVAC icon dude – he’s wearing a helmet. There’s a row of buttons on the console for gear selection, and in front of those you’ll find two rotary switches – one for Handling and another for Powertrain – each with Normal, Sport and Track settings. These will get some use today.

Time to fire up this beast and head for the hills. Jeeez, even this normally routine procedure gets event status in the baby McLaren. Whirr whirr whirrblam! You half expect to see a guy in a fire suit behind wielding a remote starter.

All testers here were fitted with the optional sport exhaust. Yeah, you’ll want this. The 570S Spider has a unique voice – racy, guttural, and not particularly mellifluous – at least until the tach needle swings to the far right. Then a suitable banshee wail accompanies the eye-opening thrust.

Getting out of Barcelona in morning rush hour is no picnic in the Spider. Even with the top down, those two oh-so-sexy buttresses block all rear three-quarter visibility, and there’s not much to see out of that little vertical rear window that goes up and down independently of the top either.

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

Unlike the seven-speed dual-clutch transmissions in the 911 Turbo and R8, the McLaren’s is not particularly happy negotiating stop-and-go traffic. The engine doesn’t like the dreary ordeal of city driving either. Those big turbos spell lag, but that’s all part of the appeal. This relative featherweight contains bona-fide racing DNA that come across load and clear. It’s a tightly coiled bundle of energy that just wants to be let off its leash, and once unfettered the 570S Spider comes into its own in a rather fabulous way.

The good old-fashioned hydraulically assisted steering is a living, breathing entity that’s quick off centre and loads up beautifully when attacking the bends. It wriggles in your hands, constantly sending back detailed information of your drive. Most of all, you’re impressed with this car’s lightness of being and exquisite balance. Yes, the standard carbon-ceramic brakes initially feel a bit wooden and require a firm foot, but out here they are progressive and easily modulated.

The more you get acquainted, the more the 570S Spider wraps itself around you like an extension of your will. Keep the twin-turbo V8 boiling above 4,000 rpm and the sound and pace are scintillating. Unlike many turbocharged engines, this one delivers the goods happily to its redline. By the numbers, the Spider blasts through the 100 km/h mark in 3.2 seconds and tops out at 328 km/h. If the roof is open, you’ll be settling for a follicle-rearranging 315 km/h.

In the track-oriented modes, the ride is super firm and the transmission rips off perfectly timed upshifts and downshifts, although it’s happy to relinquish control the moment you play with the large steering-wheel mounted shift paddles.

The 570S Spider is now the sole convertible in the McLaren lineup, and it’s predicted to become the biggest seller. I don’t doubt that for a minute. The Spider loses nothing to the hardtop in either performance or structural integrity, and having the open sky – and more of that racy exhaust blare – available at the touch of a button only expands on its desirability.

First Drive: 2018 McLaren 570S Spider

Another (almost) unforgettable experience in McLaren’s new Sport Series drop top

BARCELONA, SPAIN — Sometimes you find that sweet spot when a car and the road or track you’re experiencing it on are a perfect match. Everything flows and you seem smoother, cleaner, and more precise as a driver than ever before, the car dancing to your tune without a heartbeat’s delay. Back in October of 2015, I was in that sweet spot with the McLaren 570S on the Portimao race circuit in Portugal and the roads nearby. Something clicked that day and it was unforgettable.

So surely, then, the new McLaren 570S Spider on sun-baked roads that sweep and roll over Montserrat near Barcelona is pretty much a foregone conclusion? It’s going to be epic, right? Nevertheless, I felt it was my duty as a journalist to be absolutely sure, and duly accepted the editor’s invitation to see if a 570S with its roof removed could possibly be as good in practice as it sounds in theory. There would be no track element this time and the local Policia were, by all accounts, a little trigger happy with their radar equipment, but the 250-mile route over some incredible and varied roads should still reveal all there is to know about this enticing, almost mouth-watering proposition.

First, a bit of context. The Spider is set to become McLaren’s biggest volume seller. It joins the brand’s Sports Series range alongside the aforementioned 570S and the slightly softer and more capacious 570GT. It’s also, like all McLarens, naturally predisposed to make for a hell of a convertible simply because of its carbon fiber chassis, dubbed MonoCell II. So stiff is this central structure that the Spider has zero additional chassis bracing and the steering, suspension, and electronics tune is almost exactly the same as the coupe’s. Changes are limited to «a couple of tweaks to the damper programming» according to Ben Gulliver, McLaren’s head of vehicle development.

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So the bald numbers go like this: $208,800 (a premium of $20,200 over the coupe), 3,302 lbs (up just 101 lbs) with fluids and 90-percent fuel load, 562 hp at 7,500 rpm and 443 lb-ft at 5,000-6,500 rpm, 0 to 60 mph in 3.1-seconds, and a top speed of 204 mph with the roof up or 196 mph with the retractable hard-top stowed away. In case you’re wondering, that 60 mph time is identical to the coupe and the Spider is only one-tenth slower over the 0-124 mph (200 kph) European yardstick at 9.6 seconds.

In performance terms then, it gives away almost nothing to the coupe and dynamically it should be virtually identical, too. Perhaps the bigger question is whether the 3.8-liter twin-turbocharged V-8 will feel more characterful without a carbon-fiber barrier between driver and induction and exhaust.

For the slow crawl through Barcelona, the two-piece roof remains in place and I remind myself what I like about the 570S already: The simple, elegant cabin architecture is as appealing now as it was back in late 2015, but the quality has taken a huge leap forward. The ride, despite the «cheaper» solution of conventional springs, dampers, and anti-roll bars for the Sport Series cars as opposed to the hydraulically-linked ProActive chassis control of the 720S, is also beautifully resolved. It will patter over really broken surfaces but it rarely jars and has a lovely polish to the way it rounds off the worst bumps and lumps. The suspension settings between Normal and Sport modes are pretty close and on the smoother roads we’ll find later, even Track mode is perfectly usable. Whichever setting you choose though, you feel connected to the surface but it’s not dictating the car’s behavior.

Another highlight felt even at little more than walking pace is the steering. McLaren continues to resist electronic power assist steering systems and its faith in hydraulically assisted racks is absolutely justified in the Spider. It positively sings with feedback and the weighting and response feel so natural. It also helps this car to connect with the driver immediately, which in itself marks the Spider out as something special. A sports or supercar should engage you from the moment the wheels roll, and McLaren seems to really understand that now.

With the city slowly receding in the rear view mirror it’s time to lose the roof and get closer to that 3.8-liter V-8. The two composite panels stow away in 15 seconds at speeds of up to 25 mph and the glass wind deflector drops to 75 percent of its full height. With the windows up the wind swirls a little but it’s perfectly pleasant even at Policia-worrying speeds. And the noise? There’s plenty of it with our Sports exhaust-equipped car (a $4,090 option). The deep, frenzied blast of hot gases mirrors the simply phenomenal intensity of the acceleration. It’s not a beautiful sound. Even so, as the V-8’s angry voice reflects and bounces it ways up rock faces as the twin-clutch 7-speed gearbox punches in shifts with a wicked ignition crack, you know the 570S Spider is a pretty serious supercar.

Yes, I said supercar. McLaren likes to assert that the Sports Series cars are mere sports cars, but the speed, agility, and focus of the Spider feels pretty damn super. You really do feel the benefits of its lean carbon fiber physique compared to rivals like the R8 because it changes direction so cleanly, rides with such poise and fires along the straights with a real ferocity if you wring the engine right out. But what’s especially impressive is that there’s a delicacy to everything it does. Something like a 911 Turbo S batters a road into submission and makes progress in a series of frantic lunges. By comparison, the 570S Spider glides.

That almost balletic approach makes you want to be smoother, neater, and better, too. The pedals are perfectly placed to practice left-foot braking. When you try you find that what felt like slightly too long of a pedal travel with your right foot suddenly feels perfect. I love that you can unpeel layers of the 570S Spider’s character and abilities over time like this. It’s one of those cars you know you’d be learning new things about for months, maybe years to come.

My only problem with the 570S Spider is that there’s a slight mismatch between the magic of the chassis and the response of the twin-turbocharged V-8. You want to pour the car down a road, using its agility, mid-corner stability, and carrying speed. So your instinct is to stay in a higher gear and let the car take the strain, but when you do the Spider’s balance disappears on corner exit. You expect instant throttle response — every other control is almost telepathic — but don’t get it as the power comes in relatively slowly. The rear can’t help but steer the car and instead the nose pushes wide.

Try a gear lower and the problem remains: You’ve nailed the corner entry thanks to those lovely carbon-ceramics, turned the car in, and felt the grip levels intimately thanks to that feelsome steering. At this point the Spider is balanced, right up on its toes. You spot the road straightening and want to pop out onto it like a champagne cork, but you pin the throttle and not much happens… then, maybe a half-second after you’d wanted it, the power comes in hard but the corner is over and you feel like you only got to enjoy half of it.

Okay, maybe an even lower gear? Yep, that works. There’s still some waiting for the turbos to really start working hard, but now you can use the chassis balance and feel how well calibrated the Dynamic mode for the ESC systems is. It lets you push right to the edge but subtly manipulates the rear back into line should you over commit. Even so, there’s something slightly out of kilter here. The handling allows you to be smooth, measured, and accurate, but the engine demands you absolutely beast it to really maximise the car’s inherent poise.

I keep daydreaming about how special a 570S Spider fitted with an Audi R8 Plus engine might be. Of course, that’s never going to happen. So back in the real world (well, for some people), should you take a 911 Turbo S Cabriolet, R8 V10 Spyder or McLaren 570S Spider? I think the McLaren wins. And by a pretty decent margin.

Купе-родстер McLaren 570S Spider: 315 км/ч без крыши

Объем выпуска центральномоторных суперкаров McLaren пока небольшой: в прошлом году англичане собрали только 3286 машин. Но динамика отменная: по сравнению с 2015 годом рост почти двукратный! Сейчас компания делает ставку на «младшие» спорткары семейства 540/570, призванные конкурировать c топовыми версиями Porsche 911. Но у немецкой модели от трети до половины продаж в Европе приходится на кабриолеты. И вот через два года после премьеры базового купе McLaren 570S на свет появилась открытая версия Spider.

Несмотря на потерю крыши, жесткость кузова не уменьшилась, ведь в основе лежит несущий углепластиковый монокок, в структуру которого изначально не входит крыша (конструкция замкнутого сечения применяется только на моделях 720S и P1). Сам верх жесткий, что редкость для машин такого класса (подобную конструкцию имеет разве что Ferrari California T). Он практически такой же, что и у старших моделей 650S Spider и 675LT Spider: две панели складываются в отсек позади сидений за 15 секунд, причем запустить процесс можно и на скорости до 40 км/ч. А установленное вертикально заднее стекло выполняет роль ветрозащитного щитка: его можно поднять, чтобы уменьшить завихрения в салоне. А для компенсации уменьшенной прижимной силы спойлер на корме приподнят на 12 мм.

Складная крыша прибавила к массе спорткара 46 килограммов, отдача битурбомотора V8 3.8 не изменилась (570 л.с.), но и разгонная динамика почти не ухудшилась: 100 км/ч открытый McLaren 570S Spider набирает за те же 3,2 с, что и базовое купе, а 200 км/ч — за 9,6 с против 9,5 с. Сложенная крыша снижает максимальную скорость совсем ненамного. Если в ипостаси купе Spider может набрать 328 км/ч (как и базовая модель), то наслаждаться небом над головой можно на скорости до 315 км/ч.

Первый публичный показ Спайдера состоится на июньском фестивале скорости в Гудвуде. Открытый суперкар стоит 165 тысяч фунтов стерлингов — на 19,5 тысячи фунтов дороже купе. То есть он дороже, чем Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet и Ferrari California T (обе модели оценивается в 155 тысяч), но все же дешевле, чем Lamborghini Huracan Spyder (199 тысяч фунтов). Первые 400 заказчиков получат машины в специальном исполнении Launch Edition.

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First Drive: 2018 McLaren 570S Spider

McLaren’s al-fresco 570S Spider pins the gawk-o-meter wherever it goes

BARCELONA – As sure as the day is long, a junior supercar will eventually lose its lid. Exhibits A through C include the Ferrari 488, Audi R8 and Lamborghini Huracan. Might as well add the somewhat less exotic (but equally devastating) Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet into the mix.

Now an edgy, carbon-fibre Brit throws its hat into the ring. Or should I say to the wind? Say hello to the 2018 McLaren 570S Spider. It’s coming to Canada this September with starting price of $247,500; that’s $30,000 more than the 570S Coupe.

Funny how we’ve come to refer to these sub-650 horsepower land-based missiles as junior supercars, now that the ridiculous escalation of power (and pricing) in this rarefied segment necessitates further classification: supercars, hypercars, holy-sweet-mother of-God cars … and the Bugatti Chiron.

This, by no means, suggests the 2018 McLaren 570S Spider – with its “mere” 562 horsepower – is wanting in the go department. Is it fast? Uh, does Canadian Tire sell ladders? McLaren has picked an ideal spot for the Spider’s drive and the weather is cooperating in Spain. It’s warm, dry and sunny, and the sinuous blacktop that works its way into Barcelona’s surrounding mountains like so many black tentacles provides the perfect playground.

The 2018 570S Spider surely checks all the exotic boxes. With its carbon-fibre tub and aluminum composite skin, it weights in at a rather svelte 1,483 kilograms – that’s 228 kilograms less than the Audi R8 Spyder, we’re told. The rear mid-mounted, twin-turbo 3.8-litre V8 sends its 562 horsepower and 443 lb.-ft. of torque to the rear wheels at 5,000 rpm, and through a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission.

It’s the visuals, however, that slap you upside the head. Here in optional Curacao Blue and sporting a true exotic affectation – dihedral doors – our wicked wedge pins the gawk-o-meter wherever we go. It really is a gorgeous little thing, and watching the fifteen-second mechanical ballet that has the composite roof panel tucking itself away under the rear tonneau only adds to the allure. It will operate at speeds up to 40 km/h.

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

The wheels on this tester are optional forged lightweight units – 19-inch up front and 20-inch out back. You’ll see that word “optional” a lot here, as the Spiders on this drive are part of the initial run of 400 Launch Edition models that are generously equipped to a level that McLaren expects most customers to covet.

However, there’s no graceful way to get in thanks to the wide carbon fibre sill and steeply raked windshield. Once ensconced, the optional two-tone Carbon Black and Almond White Sport Design seat fits me perfectly. My hands land on a trim Alcantara-rimmed wheel with optional carbon fibre spokes and the coolest carbon fibre shift paddles imaginable – all part of an optional interior trim package that could be reasonably categorized as bloody essential.

The centre stack has a vertical touchscreen interface with GPS navigation that would get a “meh” in any other car. Here? Who cares. Gotta love the HVAC icon dude – he’s wearing a helmet. There’s a row of buttons on the console for gear selection, and in front of those you’ll find two rotary switches – one for Handling and another for Powertrain – each with Normal, Sport and Track settings. These will get some use today.

Time to fire up this beast and head for the hills. Jeeez, even this normally routine procedure gets event status in the baby McLaren. Whirr whirr whirrblam! You half expect to see a guy in a fire suit behind wielding a remote starter.

All testers here were fitted with the optional sport exhaust. Yeah, you’ll want this. The 570S Spider has a unique voice – racy, guttural, and not particularly mellifluous – at least until the tach needle swings to the far right. Then a suitable banshee wail accompanies the eye-opening thrust.

Getting out of Barcelona in morning rush hour is no picnic in the Spider. Even with the top down, those two oh-so-sexy buttresses block all rear three-quarter visibility, and there’s not much to see out of that little vertical rear window that goes up and down independently of the top either.

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

2018 McLaren 570S Spider

Unlike the seven-speed dual-clutch transmissions in the 911 Turbo and R8, the McLaren’s is not particularly happy negotiating stop-and-go traffic. The engine doesn’t like the dreary ordeal of city driving either. Those big turbos spell lag, but that’s all part of the appeal. This relative featherweight contains bona-fide racing DNA that come across load and clear. It’s a tightly coiled bundle of energy that just wants to be let off its leash, and once unfettered the 570S Spider comes into its own in a rather fabulous way.

The good old-fashioned hydraulically assisted steering is a living, breathing entity that’s quick off centre and loads up beautifully when attacking the bends. It wriggles in your hands, constantly sending back detailed information of your drive. Most of all, you’re impressed with this car’s lightness of being and exquisite balance. Yes, the standard carbon-ceramic brakes initially feel a bit wooden and require a firm foot, but out here they are progressive and easily modulated.

The more you get acquainted, the more the 570S Spider wraps itself around you like an extension of your will. Keep the twin-turbo V8 boiling above 4,000 rpm and the sound and pace are scintillating. Unlike many turbocharged engines, this one delivers the goods happily to its redline. By the numbers, the Spider blasts through the 100 km/h mark in 3.2 seconds and tops out at 328 km/h. If the roof is open, you’ll be settling for a follicle-rearranging 315 km/h.

In the track-oriented modes, the ride is super firm and the transmission rips off perfectly timed upshifts and downshifts, although it’s happy to relinquish control the moment you play with the large steering-wheel mounted shift paddles.

The 570S Spider is now the sole convertible in the McLaren lineup, and it’s predicted to become the biggest seller. I don’t doubt that for a minute. The Spider loses nothing to the hardtop in either performance or structural integrity, and having the open sky – and more of that racy exhaust blare – available at the touch of a button only expands on its desirability.

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD for Sale Nationwide

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2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $179,871

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $166,777

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $183,030

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $177,964

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $172,960

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CarGurus IMV of $172,610

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CarGurus IMV of $184,355

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CarGurus IMV of $177,454

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CarGurus IMV of $181,389

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CarGurus IMV of $184,097

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $184,083

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $168,384

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CarGurus IMV of $182,973

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $177,376

2018 McLaren 570S Spider RWD

CarGurus IMV of $182,548

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Источники:

http://www.automobilemag.com/news/2018-mclaren-570s-spider-review-first-drive/
http://driving.ca/mclaren/570/reviews/road-test/first-drive-2018-mclaren-570s-spider
http://www.automobilemag.com/news/2018-mclaren-570s-spider-review-first-drive/
http://autoreview.ru/news/kupe-rodster-mclaren-570s-spider-315-km-ch-bez-kryshi
http://driving.ca/mclaren/570/reviews/road-test/first-drive-2018-mclaren-570s-spider
http://www.cargurus.com/Cars/l-Used-2018-McLaren-570S-Spider-RWD-t76290

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